Dumb I Sound

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I / found m y s e l f \ at the bottom / OF A WELL\ I did not wish upon.

April 23, 2014 at 8:56pm
51,196 notes
Reblogged from connotativewords

Sleep with me. I couldn’t care less if were wearing five layers of clothes, or nothing at all. You belong in my bed. You deserve to feel the comfort of what I call ‘paradise’.
Sleep with me. I’ll help you recreate the warmth that left your fingertips years ago. I want to hear you breathe easily, as the sound drowns out every single worry on my weary mind.
Sleep with me. I don’t mean to create such a sense urgency, but you deserve to feel safe, and I’ll do everything in my power to make that happen.

— Connotativewords | jl | Slumber (via im-simply-me)

(Source: connotativewords, via harperreprah)

7:52pm
26,315 notes
Reblogged from alonesomes

I. I was the first person to teach you that love was not always a white light to a ship lost at sea.

II. On my worst days, the sky was a festering wound that wouldn’t heal. I didn’t want to be that to you.

III. On my worst days, you were the only word I could say without clenching my fists.

IV. I really did love you, I just couldn’t claw my way out of the ground to do it properly.

V. None of this was your fault.

VI. I’m sorry I was your lighthouse. I’m sorry you couldn’t see the wall of rocks on my shore.

— I wrote out six messages, then erased them all (via chatoyancies)

(via rl-y)

6:47pm
1,918 notes
Reblogged from 00sjams

loveyourchaos:

Try Again /// Aaliyah

(Source: 00sjams)

You don’t ever have to tolerate people who treat you poorly. It doesn’t matter if it’s a friend, a family member, or a partner. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve known them for or how nice they may have been to you in the past — you’re allowed to call people out on their abusive behavior. You’re allowed to set boundaries about what you are and are not willing to tolerate. You’re allowed to vocalize how their abuse makes you feel. You’re allowed to share those feelings and experiences with other people. And if necessary, you’re allowed to leave and distance yourself. You have every right to stand up and say, “I love you and I really want you to be a part of my life, but I can’t continue to allow you to treat me this way. I can’t continue to sacrifice my wellbeing for the sake of maintaining this connection. So if things don’t change, I’m going to have to cut you out of my life. Not because I don’t care about you or respect you, but because I care about and respect myself.”

— Daniell Koepke (via internal-acceptance-movement)

(via bimbiravindra)

4:39pm
1,435 notes
Reblogged from pixography
pixography:

Salvador Dali

pixography:

Salvador Dali

(via nothingelsefills)

3:35pm
392,132 notes
Reblogged from graveyardguts

(Source: , via nicethingsforawfulpeople)

2:31pm
914 notes
Reblogged from veggieomnom
luna-patchouli:

veggieomnom:

Three bean soup (kidney beans, black beans, chickpeas, sweet potato, yellow and red bell pepper, onion, canned tomatoes, dried parsley, Italian seasoning, adobo seasoning, and sriracha) with a side of guacamole and salsa.

Oh baby, I need you

luna-patchouli:

veggieomnom:

Three bean soup (kidney beans, black beans, chickpeas, sweet potato, yellow and red bell pepper, onion, canned tomatoes, dried parsley, Italian seasoning, adobo seasoning, and sriracha) with a side of guacamole and salsa.

Oh baby, I need you

1:26pm
48,504 notes
Reblogged from seebster

When [an abusive man] tells me that he became abusive because he lost control of himself, I ask him why he didn’t do something even worse. For example, I might say, “You called her a fucking whore, you grabbed the phone out of her hand and whipped it across the room, and then you gave her a shove and she fell down. There she was at your feet where it would have been easy to kick her in the head. Now, you have just finished telling me that you were ‘totally out of control’ at that time, but you didn’t kick her. What stopped you?” And the client can always give me a reason. Here are some common explanations:

"I wouldn’t want to cause her a serious injury."
“I realized one of the children was watching.”
“I was afraid someone would call the police.”
“I could kill her if I did that.”
“The fight was getting loud, and I was afraid the neighbors would hear.”

And the most frequent response of all:

"Jesus, I wouldn’t do that. I would never do something like that to her.”

The response that I almost never heard — I remember hearing it twice in the fifteen years — was: “I don’t know.”

These ready answers strip the cover off of my clients’ loss of control excuse. While a man is on an abusive rampage, verbally or physically, his mind maintains awareness of a number of questions: “Am I doing something that other people could find out about, so it could make me look bad? Am I doing anything that could get me in legal trouble? Could I get hurt myself? Am I doing anything that I myself consider too cruel, gross, or violent?”

A critical insight seeped into me from working with my first few dozen clients: An abuser almost never does anything that he himself considers morally unacceptable. He may hide what he does because he thinks other people would disagree with it, but he feels justified inside. I can’t remember a client ever having said to me: “There’s no way I can defend what I did. It was just totally wrong.” He invariably has a reason that he considers good enough. In short, an abuser’s core problem is that he has a distorted sense of right and wrong.

I sometimes ask my clients the following question: “How many of you have ever felt angry enough at youer mother to get the urge to call her a bitch?” Typically half or more of the group members raise their hands. Then I ask, “How many of you have ever acted on that urge?” All the hands fly down, and the men cast appalled gazes on me, as if I had just asked whether they sell drugs outside elementary schools. So then I ask, “Well, why haven’t you?” The same answer shoots out from the men each time I do this exercise: “But you can’t treat your mother like that, no matter how angry you are! You just don’t do that!”

The unspoken remainder of this statement, which we can fill in for my clients, is: “But you can treat your wife or girlfriend like that, as long as you have a good enough reason. That’s different.” In other words, the abuser’s problem lies above all in his belief that controlling or abusing his female partner is justifiable….

— Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men

(Source: seebster, via featherframe)

12:22pm
620 notes
Reblogged from cutie-lou-who

cutie-lou-who:

I’d love to hurt you
Easy
I’ve got you, Inside me
What do you care, if you want to
You should pay if you wanna go down

Don’t walk away
Don’t walk away, love
Don’t walk away
Just stay right here

(via loveyourchaos)

11:17am
1,689 notes
Reblogged from woodendreams
woodendreams:

(by Lijah Hanley)

woodendreams:

(by Lijah Hanley)

10:13am
443 notes
Reblogged from brightwalldarkroom
brightwalldarkroom:
Bill Murray, on acting in a Wes Anderson movie
:

"We are promised very long hours and low wages. And stale bread. That’s pretty much it. It’s this crazy thing where you’re asked to come and work a lot, and you lose money on the job, because you wind up spending more in tips than you ever earn. But you get to see the world, and see Wes live this wonderful, magical life, where his dreamscape comes true. So, if we show up, he gets to have all his fun, and I guess it’s because we like him that we go along with this…
…And, with Wes, specifically, all his props and sets are so perfect, you just have to relax and be part of the chemical process. It’s almost like the developing of a photograph. If you’re in the midst of it, you’re a part of it — this picture that he’s made. You’re like the flower in the still life.”

brightwalldarkroom:

Bill Murray, on acting in a Wes Anderson movie
:
"We are promised very long hours and low wages. And stale bread. That’s pretty much it. It’s this crazy thing where you’re asked to come and work a lot, and you lose money on the job, because you wind up spending more in tips than you ever earn. But you get to see the world, and see Wes live this wonderful, magical life, where his dreamscape comes true. So, if we show up, he gets to have all his fun, and I guess it’s because we like him that we go along with this…

…And, with Wes, specifically, all his props and sets are so perfect, you just have to relax and be part of the chemical process. It’s almost like the developing of a photograph. If you’re in the midst of it, you’re a part of it — this picture that he’s made. You’re like the flower in the still life.

(via lesbowie)

9:21am
815 notes
Reblogged from misandry-mermaid

bap521 asked: Do you ever think that if you went about your business a different way, men might respond better? I don't like rape or any of that stuff, but I also don't like annoying nagging women that think they know everything and are better then men. Like the men's tears stuff? What's that even mean? It's not funny and doesn't make men like feminists.

sinfulgod:

nymphamortem:

veganbutt:

misandry-mermaid:

Did you ever stop and think that maybe I don’t give a single iota of a shit about what you think and how you feel?

"I dont like rape or any of that stuff"
Literally oh my god

I used to be really nice about my feminism (When I ided as a feminist) and stuff, even went as far as to say I DON’T MEAN ~*ALL*~ MEN!!!!!!!

And men still didn’t like what I had to say.

Men still treated me like shit over what I had to say.

I still was on the receiving end of violence, harassment, assault, and then microaggressions.

So fuck it.

Going an extra mile to be kind to the people who’re treating me like that doesn’t make them stop, so just fuck it.

Men won’t like us no matter how nice we are, as long as we aren’t subservient.

I was this tone policing anti misandry feminist, very careful about not hurting men’s feelings, very sleek and tactful, but that was at the beginning. That was when seeing the backlash, seeing men trying to dominate conversations, men being openly misogynistic, men being offended at innocent, politically thoughtful posts and wanting to get revenge by twisting them into rape apologies or something equally as vile, was only beginning to frighten me. I always thought misogyny is not rampant at all but then I saw. I’ve grown tired after some time, and I stopped thinking feminists like MM are overreacting and they use feminism as an excuse to hate on men; I stopped thinking they are unreasonable. And I stopped thinking they enjoy this. I’m so mentally exhausted sometimes that I feel like crying. It’s scary that no matter how much you sometimes want to turn your feminist consciousness off, you can’t. And when you are this raw, when everyone is constantly touching your skinless body (despite you asking them not to, despite being patient in calm in explaining why it hurts you, sometimes you see them doing it on purpose, like hurting you was this year’s joke), after some time you lose the ability to grit your teeth and smile through it and to brush it off as just one accident, because you realise you miscalculated and accidents like this happen to you more often than you thought they would, they happen everyday. And you just start screaming.

9:09am
25,028 notes
Reblogged from beinlovewithyourlife

What is your favorite word?”
“And. It is so hopeful.

— Margaret Atwood

(Source: beinlovewithyourlife, via beatboxgoesthump)

9:04am
33,877 notes
Reblogged from finding-our-power

gokuma:

mad-lynn:

fuzzytek:

The backlog of rape kits has put justice on hold for a lot of people. Back in 2009, more than 11,000 untested kits were found in a Detroit Police Department storage facility. Some were more than 25 years old.

Mariska Hargitay speaks on some of the issues surrounding the rape kit backlog in Detroit, Michigan. #endthebacklog (x)

It costs between $1,000 – $1,500 to test every single rape kit. There are over 10,000 kits left in Detroit’s rape kit backlog. Your donation can go directly to testing them. Donate to the Detroit Crime Commission’s backlog initiative by clicking here.

I am pretty explicitly anti-police in every respect. But I support Wayne County prosecutor Kym Worthy and her push to catalogue the egregious backlog of unprocessed rape kits in Detroit. 

Her work has already identified countless serial rapists in southeast Michigan, and will continue to identify these rapist pieces of shit as she moves forward.

Who cares if this process leads to conviction or not. Just give us the list. We can take care of the rest.

"After Detroit tested the first 10% of its backlogged kits, authorities were able to link cases to 46 serial rapists." (x)

Just think about it: 46 serial rapists. And the evidence against them was out there, all the time, in those backlogged kits. And that’s just 10% of them

(Source: finding-our-power, via thechocolatebrigade)

9:01am
296 notes
Reblogged from sunst0ne

part of me is made of glass, and also, i love you.

— nicole krauss, the history of love

(Source: sunst0ne, via wah-mos)